The scores for the artworks involve changes in environment triggered by movement in space or gesture. Moving from the centre of the room to the periphery would cause different levels of response. For example, in one version people’s footsteps became louder and louder as they moved away from the centre of the room. In another, their movements would cause lines to appear on the walls of the room, in the centre even their smallest movements were tracked and as they moved away their actions were less and less visible, until at the edges they could move unseen.

Tracking: 2018

(pilot for interactive digital artwork)

Click here to watch short clip


Tracking was a pilot project, commissioned by CASIC at Keele University, that aimed to bring together somatic practice and VR to create a participatory artwork. Here I collaborated with digital composer Will Brearley (PhD student in Music Technology), VR designers Karl Reid and Tom Pardoe (School of Pharmacy) and socio-legal scholar Prof. Marie Jacob.  The artwork formed part of a Community Animation and Social Innovation centre (CASIC) organised, AHRC funded workshop, on embodied digital research methodologies.


The aim was to use digital tracking processes to intensify somatic awareness as an analytical tool that can be used by anyone. We became really interested in the digital responsive thresholds that makes movement visible and how a system can be designed to distinguish relevant movements from irrelevant movements. We used Susan Kozel’s (2007) work on the poetics of responsivity to describe a relationship that goes beyond a simple cause and affect to one that acknowledges the co-produced affect of both entities. 



 

increasing sound of rain

silence

increasing sound of rain

intense storm

intense storm



 

all movement tracked

some movements tracked

no movements tracked

no movements tracked

some movements tracked

‘As I lean forwards I hear drops of rain. If I stand in the centre of the room it is totally quiet. Each step I take towards the edge of the room makes it rain harder and harder. Half way along thunder starts. I feel aware of every minute movement. At the edge of the room the sound of the storm and rain is overwhelming  – sometimes I wanted to stay, drenched in the sound and sometimes I wanted to run back to the quiet of the centre.’ (Participant response Dec 2018)